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Jake Bishop

Jake Bishop

Being a colorblind artist has its challenges, but knowing color theory helps. By not being able to see the variations in shades of colors, my pieces are one of a kind and I can never duplicate them. It also gives them a unique look. While not photo-realistic, I strive to achieve as realistic of a look as possible. The color choices that I tend to use represent more of a Pop-Art style with bright yellows, reds, and blues. Although I mix my colors on a palette, sometimes I prefer to mix my colors directly on the canvas. This allows me to control blending from one color to the next and help with my disability. The average size of my work is around 4 to 5 feet and because of this, I can not only capture large amounts of detail, but the image itself creates a striking presence from the moment it is viewed.

The subject matter I typically work with is the human body. Every face has a story to tell. If I am not referencing a pop-culture icon, the faces I capture tend to be painted and manipulated to make them more androgynous. I find that the best story is one that is personal to the viewer and by allowing my viewers to see what they want, they create their own stories. This adds to the complexity of each of my pieces during the creation period.

I tend to use found materials such as journals or documents to create an undertone that enhances the overlaying image as well as the use of heavy applications of paint to give a thick texture to the piece. Every piece that I show has been created with a specific story in mind, and signed with my version of a Bishop chess piece- not just as a reference to my own name, but as a reminder to my viewers on how to approach the viewing of my pieces.

To see more of Jake’s work:
Facebook.com/JakeBishopArt

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